Category Archives: Sentimental Sunday

Sentimental Sunday: Murder on the Orient Express

Agatha Christie is undoubtedly the Queen of Crime. She wrote 66 detective novels, 14 short story collections, wrote the world’s longest-running play, and is listed in the Guinness Book of World Records as the best-selling novelist of all time. These are all monumental and incredibly significant achievements. And luckily for me, an Agatha Christie novel was my first introduction to the wonderful world of crime fiction.

mte5ndg0mdu0oti0mdy4mzy3
The Queen of Crime herself; Dame Agatha Christie

I remember when I was about 13 or 14 we were staying at my grandparents’ place down the South Coast of New South Wales. Every Saturday morning there is a market at Moruya, and like we did every time we were at my grandparents’ place, we visited the markets. Being a bookworm from a young age, I have always been drawn to the second-hand bookstalls at markets. This particular time, I remember my Mum picked up a thin, battered old book and showed it to me, saying that she had loved this author at my age. Seeing as the book was only $3, I bought it. That book was Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie. I had never really read books that weren’t specifically written for kids before, nor had I read a crime novel.

poirot-s12-icon-hires
Hercule Poirot as portrayed by David Suchet

At that age, I have to admit it did take me a little while to get used to the language of the books and the very proper way the characters speak – I mean, it was originally written in the 1930s! With Poirot being Belgian – not French, if you please! – I found the occasional French words and French phrases frustrating, as I didn’t understand them. And the strange abbreviations I hadn’t come across before; Mlle, M, and Mme! What were these strange combinations of letters! I eventually figured it all out and adjusted to the language, and could finally focus myself on the story being told.

orient-express-dampfzug-briefmarke-cartoon-160275

Murder on the Orient Express and the odd little character of Hercule Poirot absolutely blew me away! The attention to detail and precision of all the facts was astounding. All the red herrings, the twists and when you finally find out who the murderer is… wow! My mind was blown! I didn’t know that books like this existed! It absolutely revolutionised reading for me, and began my love of a good crime novel. Since being introduced to the Queen of Crime and her most famous detective, I have devoured many Hercule Poirot novels and continue to scour second-hand bookstalls at markets for more of these golden oldies.

Advertisements

Sentimental Sunday: Harry Potter

harry-potter

Like every child who grew up in the 1990s, Harry Potter defined my reading habits, and was the centre of my reading world for 7 years. I was 10 or 11 years old and I remember a couple of my friends talking about it, and I remember seeing a lot of kids at school reading it. So, naturally wanting to fit in, I begged my mum to buy it for me. As there was no special occasion such as a birthday or Christmas coming up, my mum said no. I kept begging for an entire school term and finally, at the start of the school holidays when we were heading on vacation to Queensland, she finally bought the first book for me.

Suddenly, I was nervous. What if I didn’t like it? What if I didn’t finish it? What if all of the hype was for nothing? I think it took me a few days to actually build up the nerve to crack it open and start reading. I remember thinking that the first page was pretty boring, thank you very much (see what I did there?), but I kept going, and like everyone around the world, I was hooked. It took me two weeks to finish the book, keeping in mind that I was only about 11, and this was in the year 2000 during the Sydney Olympics, so most evenings were spent cheering on Australia. After I finished the first one, I HAD to have the second. I even used my very own pocket money to buy it. As a kid who only earned $3 a week, this was a big deal.

harry_potter_olympics_by_adamcl3-d5brclk
The year 2000 was defined for me by Harry Potter and the Sydney Olympics

I’ve always loved books, stories and reading, but before Harry Potter, I cannot actually remember being completely drawn into any fictional story or any fictional world in the same, obsessive way that I had been with Harry Potter. It was like an awakening. Stories can be this amazing? Books can actually be this engaging and wonderful? Characters can have well-defined, relatable personalities? It was an utter revelation! Like everyone else during the peak period of Harry Potter mania (BEFORE the films, for all you young ‘uns!) it became the centre of my world. I had to have all the merchandise. Unfortunately, most of it was only readily available in the States, but luckily for me, in 2001 our family vacation took us to the West Coast of the USA, and boy did I have my Harry Potter shopping list ready! Bertie Botts Every Flavour Beans? Check! Chocolate Frogs? Check! Harry Potter Trivia Board Game? Check! Harry Potter Trading Cards? Check!

In 2002, Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire was published. I had not been a part of the craze when Prisoner of Azkaban had come out, so this was my first experience at actually pre-ordering the new book! Mum wouldn’t let me do any of the subsequent midnight launches for any of the books 4 through 7 (boo!), but I always carefully shopped around before pre-ordering to see which department store or book store was offering the best add-on incentive to pre-order with them. Usually Dymocks bookstores had the best Harry Potter swag, usually in the form of the (now vintage) metal Harry Potter bookmarks.

metal
The now-vintage, metal Harry Potter bookmarks

To this day, I am still a massive fan of EVERYTHING Harry Potter. I have been done the Harry Potter studio tour in London, I saw all eight movies as they were released in the cinemas, I have visited various filming locations around the UK from the movies, I own LOTS of Harry Potter merchandise and companion guide books, I have embraced the new world of Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them. Working in a bookstore, on the launch day in July 2016 for Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, I did a full costume dress-up as Hermione. For me, this book has and continues to define my reading habits. It defined an entire generation. If it weren’t for J.K. Rowling and her wonderful series of books about an orphaned boy who discovers he is a wizard, I don’t know if I would have been the same person that I am today.

diagonalley_homepage_hero
The Diagon Alley set at the Warner Bros. Studios in London, UK