Tag Archives: Bookish Facts

Sentimental Sunday: Murder on the Orient Express

Agatha Christie is undoubtedly the Queen of Crime. She wrote 66 detective novels, 14 short story collections, wrote the world’s longest-running play, and is listed in the Guinness Book of World Records as the best-selling novelist of all time. These are all monumental and incredibly significant achievements. And luckily for me, an Agatha Christie novel was my first introduction to the wonderful world of crime fiction.

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The Queen of Crime herself; Dame Agatha Christie

I remember when I was about 13 or 14 we were staying at my grandparents’ place down the South Coast of New South Wales. Every Saturday morning there is a market at Moruya, and like we did every time we were at my grandparents’ place, we visited the markets. Being a bookworm from a young age, I have always been drawn to the second-hand bookstalls at markets. This particular time, I remember my Mum picked up a thin, battered old book and showed it to me, saying that she had loved this author at my age. Seeing as the book was only $3, I bought it. That book was Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie. I had never really read books that weren’t specifically written for kids before, nor had I read a crime novel.

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Hercule Poirot as portrayed by David Suchet

At that age, I have to admit it did take me a little while to get used to the language of the books and the very proper way the characters speak – I mean, it was originally written in the 1930s! With Poirot being Belgian – not French, if you please! – I found the occasional French words and French phrases frustrating, as I didn’t understand them. And the strange abbreviations I hadn’t come across before; Mlle, M, and Mme! What were these strange combinations of letters! I eventually figured it all out and adjusted to the language, and could finally focus myself on the story being told.

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Murder on the Orient Express and the odd little character of Hercule Poirot absolutely blew me away! The attention to detail and precision of all the facts was astounding. All the red herrings, the twists and when you finally find out who the murderer is… wow! My mind was blown! I didn’t know that books like this existed! It absolutely revolutionised reading for me, and began my love of a good crime novel. Since being introduced to the Queen of Crime and her most famous detective, I have devoured many Hercule Poirot novels and continue to scour second-hand bookstalls at markets for more of these golden oldies.

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Fun Fact Friday: Location of Hogwarts

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Did you know that if Hogwarts were to actually exist, it would be located in the Scottish Highlands?

J.K. Rowling has said before that she has always imagined Hogwarts to be in Scotland, but that’s a big area! Based on little tidbits of information from the various Harry Potter novels, along with the fact that we know the Hogwarts Express travels north and it takes almost a whole day to get to the school via train, the math checks out and the Scottish Highlands is the only logical location for the famous school. There is a full, detailed working of this information found here.

 

 

Fun Fact Friday: Cyberspace

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Did you know that the term “cyberspace” was first coined in the 1980s?

The term “cyberspace” first appeared in the fictional works of sci-fi author William Gibson. The very first time he used the term was in a short story in 1982 called Burning Chrome, but more famously, it was used in his 1984 novel Neuromancer.