Tag Archives: Screen Version

Screen Version Saturday: The Book Thief

The Book Thief by Australian author Markus Zusak tells the story of Liesel, a girl who is sent to live with a foster family near Munich during the Second World War. With the guidance of her foster father, she learns to read and develops an intense love of books and stories. They become irresistible to her, and whenever the opportunity presents itself she steals books from around her small town. She shares her stories with Max, a Jewish man that her foster parents are hiding from the Nazis. The book itself was brilliant and has been a best seller all over the world. I especially loved the fact that the novel itself is told from the point of view of Death and not from the point of view of Liesel, the main character. This creates a sense of foreboding and darkness in the novel, balanced out by the innocence and guileless morality of Liesel.

The 2013 film, starring Sophie Nélisse, Geoffrey Rush and Emily Watson, was welcomed with a very split response from critics. Regardless, I really enjoyed the film version. This was another book-to-film adaptation that I think was done really well. Geoffrey Rush was excellent in the role of Liesel’s foster father and, in my opinion, stole the show. I thought Liesel’s foster mother in the books came across as rougher, more forbidding and more disgruntled than she did in the film. In the film I thought she seemed positively cuddly in comparison to her book character. The character of Death still narrates the film, but I felt he doesn’t have the same presence in the film that he has in the book. These are minor issues that I have with the film, and it is still a great adaptation of the book. I loved both the book and film for the fact that while the setting of Germany during WWII was important in the telling of the story, it wasn’t the central storyline itself, which is unusual for stories set in this historical period. I highly recommend everyone see this film.

 

Rating: Book screen-shot-2017-01-07-at-1-24-07-pm/ Movie screen-shot-2017-01-07-at-1-24-14-pm

Screen Version Saturday: The Time Traveler’s Wife

The Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger tells the story of Henry and Clare. Henry has a genetic condition that causes him to spontaneously and uncontrollably time travel. Clare is Henry’s wife who is left to worry about him and his frequent absences. Due to his time travelling, Clare first meets Henry when she is 6 years old, and he is 43. Henry, on the other hand, first meets Clare when he is 28 years old and she is 20. The book alternates between the first-person perspectives of these two characters, and due to the jumps in time (and ages) it can be, at first, a bit of an effort to follow and comprehend. While the book divided critics, I absolutely loved it. It was an original premise and made for an intriguing and unconventional love story. This is one of those books that I have re-read multiple times over the years. When I first heard it was being made into a movie, I was a bit worried because I loved the book so much, and the movies are NEVER as good as the books.

The 2009 film of the same name stars Eric Bana and Rachel McAdams as Henry and Clare. Much as the book did, the film also divided critics, but I actually really enjoyed it. It was a very close adaptation of the novel, and one of the better book-to-film movies I have seen. All the major and important scenes from the book are present in the film, and very few are changed or adjusted in any way for the big screen. The only major difference between the book and film is the very final scene, and while it is different, it still does the same job that the scene in the book accomplished. Rachel McAdams and Eric Bana do a fantastic job at portraying the characters of Henry and Clare, and look eerily similar to how I pictured them in my head while reading the book. Regardless of whether you have read the book or not, you will need to have tissues handy for the end of the film. I first saw this movie with two friends, one of whom had read the book, and by the end of the film all three of us were in tears. All in all, this movie is great chick flick that has emotional depth and an engaging storyline. That being said, if you are not a fan of the book, you may not be a fan of the film.

 

Rating: Book screen-shot-2017-01-07-at-1-24-14-pm/ Movie screen-shot-2017-01-07-at-1-24-14-pm