Tag Archives: Top 10 book for 2015

Review: The Little Paris Bookshop by Nina George

The Little Paris Bookshop - Nina George

“The bookseller could not imagine what might be more practical than a book…”

[The Little Paris Bookshop by Nina George, pg. 1]

The two things I love most in the world are books and travel. Without getting into a long philosophical spiel about how the two go hand in hand, I’ll just say that they both let you experience new people, new cultures and new places. So when I was perusing our pile of advance reading copies at work, this book immediately grabbed my attention because it combines my two loves – travel and books.

Jean Perdu runs a bookshop out of a converted barge on the Seine River in Paris. He calls it La Pharmacie Litéraire – the literary apothecary – for he has an unusual gift for being able to see into his customers’ souls for what they most need. For according to Jean Perdu, there is a book for every ailment of the soul.

“Perdu reflected that it was a common misconception that booksellers looked after books.

They look after people.”

[The Little Paris Bookshop by Nina George, pg.19]

However, for the past twenty-one years there is only one person that Jean Perdu has been unable to successfully prescribe a book for – himself. For twenty-one years ago, the woman that he loved abruptly left him; no goodbyes, no forewarning, just a letter that Jean Perdu has not been able to bring himself to open. However, the sudden arrival of a mysterious new neighbour in his apartment building may be just the thing Jean Perdu has been waiting for. And so, one not so special day, Jean Perdu unmoors his literary apothecary and sets off for Provence in search of answers, closure and the ability to heal his own soul.

I am not one who normally finds literary fiction all that riveting, but I absolutely adored this book. It is, in a word, beautiful. The two things that struck me the most were the vivid descriptions of the French countryside, and the wonderfully eclectic and quirky cast of characters, all of whom are so well defined and written, that I half expected them to come leaping out of the pages.

Typically, as in all novels where the main protagonist needs to find themselves to gain closure, Jean Perdu gets more than he bargains for on his impromptu trip, but it doesn’t feel clichéd or cheesy in any way. As Jean Perdu’s second greatest love is books, this novel has lots of literary and book references, each one treated with the reverence it deserves. It gave me a little thrill every time I recognised a literary reference, and every time Jean Perdu mused his feelings about literature, books and life in a way I could completely relate to.

Whilst reading this book, I tried to keep a list of the quotes I loved, but in the end, it just became too impractical because there were so many that I loved, and that resonated with me. This is definitely one of those books where you try to explain to people why you loved it so much, but end up saying “You just have to read it, trust me”.

I would definitely recommend this book to those readers who like to read beautiful books, and to those who have a book addiction like myself. If you have ever looked for closure, called yourself a bookworm, been bitten by the travel bug or simply enjoyed quirky literary characters, then this book is definitely one for you.

Rating: 10/10

This book is due out in Australia on 14th April 2015.

Review: Golden Son by Pierce Brown

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“I’m still playing games. This is just the deadliest yet.”

The tag line for Golden Son bodes extremely well for those who, like myself, got completely hooked on Red Rising (you can read my review here). I thought the toughest, deadliest, trickiest and most harrowing part of Darrow’s mission was over.

Apparently not.

Golden Son opens two years after the events that took place at the end of Red Rising. Darrow is now at the Academy where he is learning the art of war. He has fully ingratiated himself into Augustus’ retinue and into Gold society. He has made friends and enemies, as any good Gold does, and is well on his way to bringing down everything from the inside. Darrow soon finds himself heading up a full-scale rebellion against the Sovereign and the Society. It’s Gold against Gold, with constantly shifting allegiances. Darrow thinks he knows who he can trust, but they are all Golds – can he truly trust any of them? And with so many people from of colours becoming collateral damage along the way, is Darrow really willing to do what it takes to bring about change?

As Golden Son unfolds, we realise more and more that the Institute was child’s play – it was nothing compared to the Golds, war and alliances of the real world. Darrow not only has to be a good fighter, he also has to out-think, out-manoeuvre and out-politicise his enemies. And this makes for an excellent novel. It is a suspenseful, enthralling story that you enjoy reading, but also makes you think about what is happening. Personally, I kept thinking about how many of the seemingly isolated interactions and incidents may fit into the bigger picture, because, in the end, they all do, and it’s a lot of fun trying to figure out how.

Red Rising was as much about Darrow learning how to navigate the Institute and the world as a Gold as it was about him completing his mission and getting justice. Similarly, Golden Son is as much about bringing down the Sovereign – Octavia au Lune – and the Society, as it is about Darrow questioning his own motives, his morality and whether or not he is the person Eo would have wanted him to become. Yes, this novel has a lot of action, death and destruction, but it also is about the internal struggle Darrow is experiencing.

As in Red Rising, the characters in this novel continue to be extremely well crafted and well defined. Those characters we encountered in the last book, and that reappear in Golden Son have a wonderful new depth to them, especially Darrow as he questions himself in a way that the other characters do not seem to.

And what an ending!

I have read a lot of books in my lifetime (so far…) and this is the most dramatic ending I have come across – the cliff-hanger to end all cliff-hangers! I’m pretty sure I held my breath for the last 6 pages of the book, and that my heart stopped beating for the final 2 paragraphs. How am I supposed to be expected to wait until 2016 to find out what happens?!

Definitely recommended for those who loved Red Rising. For those who haven’t read either of Pierce Brown’s wonderful works, I would definitely recommend reading Red Rising first otherwise you will find yourself a bit lost with what is going on in Golden Son.

Rating: 10/10